Smile

I love music; literally any music. So to try and choose a song that I like over any other is really difficult for me. I tend to find a song, play it on repeat for a couple of days, then move on to the next one. And this week I’ve had Smile (sung by Mikky Ekko and written by Gregory Kurstin, James Eliot, and Mikky Ekko) on repeat. I really like this song’s lyrics and the sound of it. It’s basically saying to just smile, no matter what. And I like how the actual song is not an overly happy, upbeat song. To me it starts off on more of a somber note, like the singer knows life is hard and it’s not always easy to look past it and smile. But, the beat does pick up as the song goes on as if listening to it will make you happier and cause you to smile.

Also, the lyrics as I mentioned earlier are really good. They’re very simple but sometimes simple ideas are forgotten in our hectic days. It starts off by telling you to “smile, the worst is yet to come”; to be grateful that for the small things that will always be there, even if your life seems like a mess at that moment. Everyone is “trying so hard to get it all right” but sometimes we just have to appreciate the little things we’ve accomplished and not try too hard to be perfect. And at the end the singer knows that “time will eventually knock on my door/ And tell me I’m not needed around anymore” but “when I’m quiet I can nearly hear him say/ smile, the worst is yet to come”. I just really like all the ideas tied to this songs and the lyrics, especially the end. We just need to remember to take a step back from life and just smile before it’s too late.

The song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLYhr11Exhg

Lyrics

Smile, the worst is yet to come
We’ll be lucky if we ever see the sun
Got nowhere to go, we could be here for a while
But the future is forgiven, so smile

We’re trying so hard to get it all right
But only feel lonely at the end of the night
And I wanna be somewhere away from this place
Yeah, somewhere just a little closer to grace

I’ll smile, the worst is yet to come
We’ll be lucky if we ever see the sun
Got nowhere to go, we could be here for a while
But the future is forgiven, so smile
Smile

Well, call me loser, call me thief
Tell me I’m special when you spit at me
‘Cause I don’t wanna be lonely, I wanna be loved
And I want you to hold me like I’m the only one

I’ll smile, the worst is yet to come
We’ll be lucky if we ever see the sun
Got nowhere to go, we could be here for a while
But the future is forgiven, so smile
Smile

And time will eventually knock on my door
And tell me I’m not needed around anymore
But he’ll hold me so close at the end of the day
When I’m quiet I can nearly hear him say

Smile, the worst is yet to come
We’ll be lucky if we ever see the sun
Got nowhere to turn, and we’ve got nothing but time
But the future is forever, the future is forever, so smile, so smile, so smile

Smile, the worst is yet to come
We’ll be lucky if we ever see the sun

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Fiction with memories thrown in

      “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien is a novel about the Vietnam War and the life of a soldier, both on and off duty. The novel is very well written; it draws the reader in easily. While most have not fought in a war, the emotions and thoughts the novel bring to the surface are relatable (regret, fear, sadness, and just about all other emotions someone could feel). The novel has a very real sense to it; like everything your reading has occurred. However, O’Brien is very clear that this is a work of fiction (he repeats it several times in the book). But, he also admits that he has tried to make this work of fiction seem as real as possible in any way possible: dialogue, character names, and even the dedication of the book. And while that all makes sense – trying to make it seem real, so the reader becomes more invested – it also has some truth to it.

      O’Brien wrote this novel 20 years after the war. He said he needed distance and a sort of objectivity to the work so his thoughts about it could reorganize the material. Meaning that the work is on some level real and has truth to it. Personally, I feel like if some relatively important event happened to me, and 5 years later I tried to remember it, I probably couldn’t remember all the details. I would end up filling in some of the gaps with fictitious things (not even on purpose) and then that would become my memory. So, there is truth to the novel, but it is fiction, just like how some memories become so distant they have a sense of fakeness to them. I think that entire aspect of novel is really interesting and makes sense. O’Brien is definitely an amazing writer who easily draws people into his fake/real world of Vietnam.

Realities of War

The website Historynet.com has a section were veterans of the Vietnam War tell their stories. I read one that stood out to me about George Banda: Medical Specialist 4, 2nd Battalion, 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. His story is a very real, raw, sad one about the realities of war. One day, he and others, were stationed out in this dangerous location when they were attacked. 37 Americans ended up dying during that event, and Banda was almost one of them (he was shot on the side of his head). However, the most important part was Banda trying to save his friend, Ed. Banda recounts how he managed to carry Ed up a hill, stay with him and try it keep this dying man awake. Sadly unfair, even though helped arrived, Ed still passed away. This story seems to be something out of a movie (Forrest Gump, maybe) a man hit still trying to save his comrades.

As Banda describes his story of trying to save Ed, I couldn’t help but feel upset. Just imagining that situation makes me tense up, it had such serious consequences (as war often does). Banda must have considered his decision would mean danger or relative safety, helping others or yourself, life or death. Seeing his friend dying, stranded out by themselves, but knowing if he went he could also die must have been heart wrenching. I’m 99% sure if I was in that situation, I would do what Banda did; help others. However, I’ve never been in that situation (and hopefully never will) where I can feel myself bleeding out, and if I ever was I hope I could find the strength to help my friend. Then to have Ed still pass away, must have been awful for him. To work so hard for something, yet it wasn’t enough, honestly I would have been mad and even felt a little betrayed. Banda’s story seems like fiction, an upsetting story from an author. But, knowing it’s all real is crazy and makes me feel grateful I don’t have to deal with such situations. His story is not a happy one, but a raw one from the realities of war. While it’s pretty depressing, it is nice to know that Banda still visits Ed at the cemetery from time to time.

His story: http://www.historynet.com/my-war-army-medic-george-banda.htm

Other Blogs

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https://oliviology.wordpress.com/2015/09/08/homework-week-of-97/comment-page-1/#comment-49

-A new invention that would put a camera in your oven.

https://saradactylssuperblog.wordpress.com/2015/09/27/january-28/comment-page-1/#comment-59

-The challenger exploded on the same day as her birthday .

https://eatpraycatz.wordpress.com/2015/09/13/dismaland-the-uks-most-dissapointing-new-visitor-attraction/comment-page-1/#comment-27

-Dismaland is a horribly sarcastic, slightly disturbing version of Disneyland.