Copies of Othello

I looked at 3 different versions of the play Othello by Shakespeare. I first looked at the First Folio which is definitely different than the millions of copies of the play floating around today. Starting off, the actual words and look of the First Folio is different than modern books or plays. I like that though; there is a definite beauty to the printing and books from back then. It’s much prettier to look at than today’s books. Besides that, the wording and spelling is slightly different (but, what can you expect? Everything changes over time). Also, an odd thing about that version is the last word, whether speech or a character’s name, is on the bottom right hand corner of the previous page. I’m not sure why they would do that; maybe as a preview for the next page.

I also looked at the Third Folio and that style is also it that version. I also noticed the spelling more in this one, like the way ‘murder’ or ‘ho’ was spelled: murther, hoa. And the shape of a ‘s’ is different too (in this one and the First Folio as well), more exaggerated and took me a second to become accustomed to. Again, I was more distracted by the actual look of the text, rather than the text. The style of writing/printing and layout of writing of that era is just prettier to look at compared to today’s works.

Finally I looked at the version in Quarto 1. Again the spelling is different, this one to me was the most different looking (I skimmed). Also this one has the thing with a word being in the bottom right hand corner. I would like to know why that was done; what was the reasoning behind it; whether it was just stylistically or grammar rules of that time period. In the three copies I looked at, I read Act 5, Scene 2; it is the climax of the whole play and the writing is very well done. All the copies were slightly different from each other, yet the same. The message of the scene came across in them all. However, compared to modern copies, they are definitely different. But, in all honesty I think I like the older translations better than modern ones.

“As The World Falls Down”

So recently many great artist have passed away that helped shape the music we listen to now. While I know of the others and listened to their work, I love David Bowie’s music most. And though he has numerous songs that are amazing, I have a special place in my heart for “As The World Fall Downs”. I first heard this song years ago when I watched Labyrinth where Bowie starred as the Goblin King. This movie to me was great (kinda weird I’ll admit) because of its totally 80’s vibe with some fairytale characteristics thrown in. It’s also the first time I was introduced to Bowie and his unique sound and style. The scene this song is featured in is also one of my favorite scenes too, definitely had a magical, princess/weird evil prince feel to it.

The song itself I love too. Probably because it reminds me of the movie, but also because of the music and melody; the opening notes have a huge 80’s vibe to them which I love. It seems like a simple melody, but sometimes those are the best. The way he sings this song adds to its amazingness too. When he sings the lyrics his voice changes throughout the whole song and has such an uniquely Bowie sound. I also like the lyrics (they are a little creepy considering he sings this to a 16 year old girl in the movie). They have a very somber, sad quality that holds some truth; sometimes love is not an amazing thing, it can hurt. Overall, this song has a special quality to me, whether it be from the movie, the lyrics, the sound, the artist, or all of it combined; I really like it. Watch the movie, listen to the song and appreciate the very signature style of David Bowie.

“As The World Falls Down”
There’s such a sad love
Deep in your eyes.
A kind of pale jewel
Open and closed
Within your eyes.
I’ll place the sky
Within your eyes.

There’s such a fooled heart
Beatin’ so fast
In search of new dreams.
A love that will last
Within your heart.
I’ll place the moon
Within your heart.

As the pain sweeps through,
Makes no sense for you.
Every thrill is gone.
Wasn’t too much fun at all,
But I’ll be there for you-ou-ou
As the world falls down.

Falling.
Falling down.
Falling in love.

I’ll paint you mornings of gold.
I’ll spin you Valentine evenings.
Though we’re strangers ’til now,
We’re choosing the path
Between the stars.
I’ll leave my love
Between the stars.

As the pain sweeps through,
Makes no sense for you.
Every thrill is gone.
Wasn’t too much fun at all,
But I’ll be there for you-ou-ou
As the world falls down.

Falling
As the world falls down.
Falling
As the world falls down.
Falling.
Falling.
Falling.
Falling in love
As the world falls down.
Falling.
Falling.
Falling.
Falling.
Falling in love
As the world falls down.
Makes no sense at all.
Makes no sense to fall.
Falling
As the world falls down.
Falling.
Falling in love
As the world falls down.
Falling.
Falling
Falling in love
As the world falls down.

 

Othello Excerpt Translation

Enter DESDEMONA, IAGO, and Attendants

DUKE OF VENICE
I think this tale would win my daughter too.
Good Brabantio,
Take up this mangled matter at the best:
Men do their broken weapons rather use
Than their bare hands.

BRABANTIO
I pray you, hear her speak:
If she confess that she was half the wooer,
Destruction on my head, if my bad blame
Light on the man! Come hither, gentle mistress:
Do you perceive in all this noble company
Where most you owe obedience?

DESDEMONA
My noble father,
I do perceive here a divided duty:
To you I am bound for life and education;
My life and education both do learn me
How to respect you; you are the lord of duty;
I am hitherto your daughter: but here’s my husband,
And so much duty as my mother show’d
To you, preferring you before her father,
So much I challenge that I may profess
Due to the Moor my lord.

BRABANTIO
God be wi’ you! I have done.
Please it your grace, on to the state-affairs:
I had rather to adopt a child than get it.
Come hither, Moor:
I here do give thee that with all my heart
Which, but thou hast already, with all my heart
I would keep from thee. For your sake, jewel,
I am glad at soul I have no other child:
For thy escape would teach me tyranny,
To hang clogs on them. I have done, my lord.

Unfamiliar words-
1. Mangled matter- this confusing, unpleasant situation
2. The wooer- to seek the affection, favor, or love of
3. For thy escape- if they were to leave me
4. Clogs- an encumbrance or impediment

Contemporary English translation-

DESDEMONA, IAGO, and attendants enter

DUKE OF VENICE
I think a story like this would win my daughter also
Brabantio,
Try to make the best out of this unpleasant situation
Men often use broken weapons, instead of useful things

BRABANTIO
Please, let her speak:
If she says she wanted this also
Then blame me,
I won’t blame Othello! Come here, my child.
Who do you follow?

DESDEMONA
Father,
I’m torn on my duty:
I’m bound to you because you provided me life and education
Those things have taught me
How to respect you; you’re the one I have to obey;
I am your daughter: but he is my husband,
And like my mother decided to follow you
Choosing you, over her own father,
I have to give my obedience
To the Moor, my husband.

BRABANTIO
I’m done, then.
Duke, please continue with your business
I would rather adopt a child, then be handed one
Come here, Moor:
I am going to give you my blessing on this marriage,
Which you already have, but with all of me
I would try and keep it from you. Desdemona,
I am glad you are my only child:
If I had others and they tried to leave, I would become a tyrant
And try to lock them up. I’m done here.

Figures of speech:
“Men do their broken weapons rather use, then their bare hands”
– Men often fight against what they can’t fix with useless things instead of choosing an obvious alternative
“You are the lord of duty”
– Your my father, I should respect you and follow you
“I had rather to adopt a child then get it”
– I would rather choose my own children then be forcefully given one through my daughters marriage

I like how the figurative language (metaphors, etc.) added an extra meaning to the characters speech. Most were an underlying insult- very passive aggressive phrases. They all added a subtle humor to a pretty serious situation. Instead, of characters saying mean things outright (especially in front of the governing people in that town) there speech would have slightly subtle message within it. I enjoyed the humor it added to this scene.

The Hateful Eight

Recently I went to see “The Hateful Eight,” the 8th film by Quentin Tarantino. This ‘western’ (not really) is both written and directed by Tarantino and has all his trademarks: dark humor, comedic violence, and lots of profanity. Unlike some of his other movies with an intricate plot line, “The Hateful Eight” is relatively straightforward. Basically, 8 people are stuck in cabin due to a blizzard and nobody trust one another. The movie is called “The Hateful Eight” for a reason; none of the 8 characters are really ‘good’ guys (a few have qualities that could cause viewers to favor them over others, but that’s as far as it goes). I personally, really enjoyed watching it (even though it was over 3 hours). While the characters aren’t ‘good’ they each have their moments that add to the darker humor in the film, and based on that reason (and the good dialogue they all share) I liked all of them; some more than others though. Back to the dark humor and comedic violence; this film is filled with it. I like that aspect of Tarantino’s films- it adds a quality that I find very entertaining- but if you are not into constant profanity and lots of gore/ blood splattering everywhere; this one (and his films) isn’t for you.

Also, this movie was shot in Ultra Panavision 70 process, and I think it added to the feel of the movie, and made it that more amazing. The movie itself was shot beautifully, especially the sweeping shots of the mountains and landscape,  (also, it was shot as if it were a play, with Act 1, Act 2, etc.- which is cool). The acting was great, as well as the interaction between characters. Finally, one of my favorite aspects: the musical score composed by Ennio Morricone. I definitely feel like music adds a great deal at a movie, and this one did not disappoint. It was amazing. You’ll have to watch to see.

Overall, this movie was well written, had great cinematography, an incredible score, great acting and I highly recommend it.